General Orthopaedics

Fracture Treatment

A fracture is when a bone becomes either partially or completely broken, whether it is crosswise, length-wise, or in multiple places. The bone can break because of a fall, an accident, overuse, etc. Treatment depends on the severity of the break. At Carolina Regional Orthopaedics our physicians will discuss with you how the injury occurred and your medical history. Our physicians will then perform an examination to assess the extent of your injury, including an x-ray to help provide a better understanding of the injury. Once the physician has reviewed all the factors stated above, he will choose the treatment best suited for your needs. These treatments may include cast immobilization, functional cast or brace, traction, or surgery. Cast immobilization is a plaster or fiberglass cast to keep the broken ends in the correct position while they heal. This is a very common treatment for bone fractures. A functional cast or brace is a brace that allows for limited controlled movement. Traction is when the bones are aligned by a gentle pulling action to help stabilize and realign a bone fracture. If surgery is recommended by the physician, details will be discussed in depth with each patient before the surgery is performed.


Surgery and Corrective Repair of the Foot

There are common foot related injuries that may prevent people from doing every day activities such as walking or moving around. The pain can be caused by many familiar problems such as flatfoot, foot fracture, cavus foot, bailed bunion repair, etc. that can be surgically and correctively repaired by an orthopaedic surgeon.


Sprains and Strains

Dr. Lafranchi with patient

A sprain and a strain are very common injuries that can be confused as the same thing. However, a sprain occurs in a ligament, whereas a strain occurs in a muscle or tendon. A sprain is when the tissue that connects two bones together is stretched or torn. A strain occurs when the tissue that connects the muscle to bone is stretched or torn. Symptoms for both can include limited movement of the joint that is affected, pain, and swelling. A symptom specifically for a sprain includes a “pop” in the joint at the time of the injury, while a specific symptom for a strain may include muscle spasms. If the injury becomes more serious you may not be able to walk more than four steps without considerable pain or move the affected joint. You may also have pain that is directly over the injured area, or have numbness in any area of the injured area. In these cases it is best to seek a professional orthopaedic opinion. For mild sprains or strains, successful at home treatment can include rest, ice, compression, and elevation.


Work Related Injuries

Each state has their own requirements for Workers’ Compensation that is regulated by the state's Industrial Commission. There is a simple five-step process specifically for North Carolina. The first step begins with seeking out appropriate medical treatment. If your employer has a health care provider on-site and is compatible with their instructions, then the on-site health provider is the appropriate medical treatment to seek. If your employer does not have an on-site health provider, then you may be instructed to visit a designated health care office. It must be established that the injury was related to your work and your employer’s name must be provided. This will allow your health care provider to bill the treatment as a workers’ compensation claim. The main goal of the Workers’ Compensation in North Carolina is to ensure you have the medical care needed to restore your health and ability to work as you had before the accident.


Arthritis Care

Dr. Galisin with patient

Arthritis is joint pain that can occur at any age. Symptoms may include swelling, pain, and stiffness of the joints. They can be anywhere from mild to severe, while the symptoms may stay the same for a couple of years. Arthritis pain may also progress rapidly. There are many different body areas where arthritis can occur. Once your arthritis is clearly diagnosed, the Carolina Regional Orthopaedics’ physician who is specifically trained in that area will treat you. This condition can make simple every day activities difficult to accomplish. The fundamental goal of arthritis care is to help reduce pain, improve joint function, and restore full range of motion. Arthritis care encourages lifestyle changes including exercise, physical therapy, and dietary changes to accomplish its goals.


Osteoporosis Care

Osteoporosis is a disease in which bone tissue breaks down faster than it can be replaced. The bones are more likely to fracture (break), because they become more thin and brittle over time. The spine, hips, wrists, and ribs are the most common fractured bones in people with osteoporosis; however any bone in the body may be affected. The best way to prevent osteoporosis is to build strong bone early in life, which helps reduce bone loss. At home self-care of osteoporosis includes getting more exercise, eating a balanced diet that is rich in calcium and vitamin D, and reducing unhealthy habits such as smoking or excessive drinking. Increasing the amount of calcium intake helps prevent bone loss, while increasing the vitamin D, which allows the body to increase the amount of calcium absorbed by food. Exercising and staying active for a total of 30 minutes per day strengthens bones and helps maintain bone mass. High-impact, weight bearing activities, such as dancing, climbing stairs, jogging, hiking, etc. are the most effective exercises to help strengthen bones.

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